What is Mindfulness?

Practice Mindfulness has become such as a trend in recent times. But what, exactly is it?

Mindfulness has become such as a trend in recent times. But what, exactly, is it? At its origins, Mindfulness is an ancient Buddhist practice for buddhist Monks, as the prayer is for Christians, but you don’t need to become a Buddhist to enjoy Mindfulness Meditation rewards.

Why to be Mindful? Because Mindfulness is a tool that helps us realize the richness and possibilities of our own growth and transformation. Cultivating a Mindful attitude connects us with many aspects of ourselves that we often overlook, that we ingnore (Linving often only on surface of life situations) Opening us to new awareness and ways of existing both in our own skin, in the world and in relationship with the world.

Mindfulness involves an elemental and spontaneous openness to life and to the comprehension of a deeper meaning of the experience of in present moment, grounded in the body, in the timeless, in not expecting anything to happen, a befriending and inhabiting of this present moment for its own purpose. When you rest in mindful awareness, you are participating intimately in life as it is unfolding, seeing what happens, experimenting, allowing the original beauty and mystery of the existence.

Science is exploring even more how Mindfulness meditation can strengthens our ability to attune to life and others specifically, how it strengthens the part of our brain responsible for regulating emotions, heightening communication, and reducing stress (for example through the method MBSR Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction ideated by Jon Kabat-Zinn) and anxiety.

Mindfulness practice, which tends to be highly repetitive when engaged in regularly, from 10 to 45 minutes per day, is a major driver of neuroplastic changes in the brain, starting from the moment that a practitioner begins a meditation program.

Throughout a regular Mindfulness practice the mind can change the brain (Siegel 2007). This means that if we train our minds through meditative disciplines, we can grow into seeing more clearly and acting spontaneously with greater awareness, calm, compassion, and wisdom.

Author: Cristina Capucci

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